News

3 Shocking Stats on Veteran Transition …and what we can do about it

VTW Stats

  1. 48% OF VETERANS REPORT THAT THEIR TRANSITION WAS MORE DIFFICULT THAN EXPECTED

The National Association for Veteran Serving Organizations, or NAVSO, conducts research on the experience of transitioning veterans, and has found that nearly half of them underestimated the difficulty that their separation from the military would bring.

Military transition is full of complexity, and is a process that impacts—and is impacted by—myriad factors, including: finances, professional growth, and family life. Veterans cite various reasons for the discrepancy between their perceived expectations about transition and its reality. Regardless of the driving factor–for any process as complex as this one–it is absolutely critical to have a strong support network and to draw strength from PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS.

 

  1. NEARLY HALF OF VETERANS LEAVE THEIR FIRST CIVILIAN POSITION WITHIN TWELVE MONTHS OR LESS

According to a study of thousands of transitioning veterans that was conducted by the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University, one in every two veterans will leave their first post-separation position within a year–and not because of an employer’s dissatisfaction.

Why are Veterans leaving civilian careers in such high numbers? Again, this is a complicated issue with several contributing factors; unfortunately, many of these factors—including a disjointedness with a company’s ethics or culture—are outside of an individual veteran employee’s control. One important factor, however, is undoubtedly within our control. Many of us find ourselves feeling dispassionate about our careers and, in particular, that our job under-utilizes our unique skills and strengths or doesn’t align with our true passions. For this reason, FEELING AUTHENTICALLY ENGAGED by one’s career is essential to professional growth and personal fulfillment.

 

  1. 92% OF VETERANS IDENTIFY ‘MEANINGFULNESS OF WORK’ AS A KEY INGREDIENT TO HAPPY EMPLOYMENT

Another important finding of IVMF’s study, is the role that purposeful and meaningful work play in relationship to job satisfaction. In fact, 1/3 of respondents say that they would have stayed in their first civilian career if it had provided them with more challenge and meaning.  Perhaps this isn’t surprising. After all, those of us who have served in the military are driven by a sense of purpose and meaning. Why wouldn’t that continue to drive us after our time in service is complete?

 

So, what do these stats tell us? What do we know?

We know that veteran transition is difficult—difficult beyond the expectations of many—and that it warrants our sustained and purposeful consideration. We know that veterans are feeling under-utilized in their careers and that meaningfulness is lacking.

So what do we do about high career attrition rates, dissatisfying jobs, and lack of purpose?

Travis Manion Foundation fervently believes that positive relationships, increased engagement, and an enhanced sense of meaning offers an antidote to these three challenges. That’s why we began our Veteran Transition Workshops in San Diego, Philadelphia, and Washington DC, for current and former service members struggling with these challenges. These day-long workshops offer hands-on resources and tools that drive positive relationships, increase career engagement, and offer solutions to establish meaning both in and outside of work. Stay tuned for more exciting news on these impactful services for veterans and how dozens are already benefitting from them.

Interested in joining the next workshop as a participant or volunteer? Don’t miss this opportunity!

West Coasters: heather.kelly@travismanion.org

East Coasters: CDMeast@travismanion.org

Back to all news